Does Merton need a new secondary school with a Christian ethos?

Wimbledon Guardian: The consultation will be held at Benedict Primary School The consultation will be held at Benedict Primary School

A charity is gathering opinion on another new school in Merton this month.

Chapel St Community Schools Trust is proposing a state-funded secondary school for Merton called Trinity High School, set to open in September 2016.

The trust is a national charity that sponsors Christian ethos schools and is behind the Park Community School, which does not yet have a site but is due to open this September with temporary buildings in place.

A public consultation on the Trinity High School plans will be held on Thursday, April 10 at Benedict Primary School, Church Road, Mitcham from 7pm.

To complete a questionnaire on the plans, visit the website.

Trinity High School will join seven other schools in the Chapel St family of schools, including two primary schools - Benedict Primary School and Park Community School in the borough.

Comments (3)

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3:56pm Wed 2 Apr 14

Luke Sumpner says...

What I think matters most about religious schools is whether they discriminate on the basis of the religion of the parent's of their students (the student's themselves being too young to make an informed choice). This should be illegal in my opinion and I would oppose any new school if it had such a policy. The article doesn't state if this new school intends to discriminate.

I think schools with a faith ethos are a bad idea because they would tend to segregate students by their faith (or lack of). The experience in Northern Island of faith segregation informs my thinking here.

Moreover on a personal level I wouldn't want any child of mine sent to a Christian school because I think the doctrine of blind faith, which is a critical part of most religions including Christianity, is damaging to a child's intellectual development.
What I think matters most about religious schools is whether they discriminate on the basis of the religion of the parent's of their students (the student's themselves being too young to make an informed choice). This should be illegal in my opinion and I would oppose any new school if it had such a policy. The article doesn't state if this new school intends to discriminate. I think schools with a faith ethos are a bad idea because they would tend to segregate students by their faith (or lack of). The experience in Northern Island of faith segregation informs my thinking here. Moreover on a personal level I wouldn't want any child of mine sent to a Christian school because I think the doctrine of blind faith, which is a critical part of most religions including Christianity, is damaging to a child's intellectual development. Luke Sumpner
  • Score: 5

12:19pm Thu 10 Apr 14

all of us together says...

No child should be forced to be a 'insert parental religion here'. People aren't born to a particular religion and it should be their choice following a balanced and unbiased eduction. If at 18, you want to join the same cult/sect as your parents then that's fine. No school should be allowed legally to promote one brand of religion over another. All schools should have a curriculum that encourages children to explore religion as an academic subject, alongside lessons in accepting diversity in sexuality and race and culture. This will then ensure that they are able to decide, for themselves, if they wish to follow a particular religion, or more likely as they will have had an appropriate education, to decide that atheism is a much more logical option.
No child should be forced to be a 'insert parental religion here'. People aren't born to a particular religion and it should be their choice following a balanced and unbiased eduction. If at 18, you want to join the same cult/sect as your parents then that's fine. No school should be allowed legally to promote one brand of religion over another. All schools should have a curriculum that encourages children to explore religion as an academic subject, alongside lessons in accepting diversity in sexuality and race and culture. This will then ensure that they are able to decide, for themselves, if they wish to follow a particular religion, or more likely as they will have had an appropriate education, to decide that atheism is a much more logical option. all of us together
  • Score: 0

7:56pm Fri 11 Apr 14

Merton pork says...

Definitely not.
Definitely not. Merton pork
  • Score: 0

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