Hospitals diverted patients to cuts-threatened St Helier ten times this year

Wimbledon Guardian: Hospitals diverted patients to cuts-threatened St Helier ten times this year Hospitals diverted patients to cuts-threatened St Helier ten times this year

St Helier Hospital’s accident and emergency (A&E) unit has had to take in emergency patients from other hospitals on 10 separate occasions this year, adding to fears that its closure will reduce emergency care to “First World War field hospitals”.

The figures show Croydon University Hospital’s A&E unit diverted its services to St Helier on six occasions, including once on Monday, September 3, and three times in August.

Ambulances that would have taken patients from St George’s Hospital, Tooting, were diverted to St Helier three times, while Kingston Hospital patients were diverted to St Helier once.

On one occasion this year, March 15, St Helier’s A&E services were diverted to another hospital.

Geoff Martin, from anti-cuts campaigners London Health Emergency, said the figures proved the NHS’s plans to close St Helier’s A&E would put an unmanageable amount of pressure on the other three hospitals in the region.

He said: “It proves the point we have been making throughout – this closure would lead to a complete breakdown in emergency treatment.

“More people are using A&E and you just can’t maintain a commitment to see everyone within four hours if the cuts go through. It will reduce Croydon and others to First World War field hospitals."

But a spokesman for the NHS’s Better Services Better Value (BSBV) review said the other hospitals' A&E units would be bigger if St Helier's proposed cuts went through.

He said: “If BSBV proposals went ahead, Croydon, Kingston and St George’s A&Es would be expanded so they would be bigger units. 

“Projections show the expanded units would be comfortably able to cope with the numbers of patients using them.

"More senior doctors would also be available at the expanded A&Es, making the services safer for patients.”

An A&E divert is a temporary diversion of some patients from one hospital to other A&E Departments to provide temporary respite, and is agreed between a hospital and the London Ambulance service.

A spokeswoman for Croydon Health Services said their most recent diverts to St Helier, on September 3 and August 28, were in place for 90 minutes and only affect ‘non blue-light’ ambulances.

She said: “There are a number of reasons why a divert needs to be made; in particular it is used to manage the number of patients within the unit therefore ensuring the safety of all our patients.

“This may happen when, for example, we have a high number of ambulances arriving at a similar time.

“The Trust also often receives ambulances and patients that have been diverted from other hospitals that are on ‘divert’."

But Mitcham and Morden MP Siobhain McDonagh, a leading voice against plans to axe St Helier's maternity and A&E units, said: "What will be the consequences for local people when St Helier is no longer a safety valve for other hospitals?

"The consultants I've spoken to tell me they do not support these proposals despite BSBV telling us these cuts are proposed by clinicians."

Comments (16)

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2:10pm Thu 13 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

What will be the point of the Consultation if BSBV keep their blindfold on and earplugs in and are due to dematerialise into the ether anyway?
What will be the point of the Consultation if BSBV keep their blindfold on and earplugs in and are due to dematerialise into the ether anyway? Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

2:30pm Thu 13 Sep 12

Krissi says...

last time I needed an ambulance I had been run over in Beddington- I was told the A&E at what was then Mayday was closed at 5pm- ok that was over 30 years ago but what happens if it is the same now, when St Helier's one has been taken away ?
last time I needed an ambulance I had been run over in Beddington- I was told the A&E at what was then Mayday was closed at 5pm- ok that was over 30 years ago but what happens if it is the same now, when St Helier's one has been taken away ? Krissi
  • Score: 0

11:18pm Thu 13 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

Krissi wrote:
last time I needed an ambulance I had been run over in Beddington- I was told the A&E at what was then Mayday was closed at 5pm- ok that was over 30 years ago but what happens if it is the same now, when St Helier's one has been taken away ?
Never get run over in Beddington. If the long distance travel searching for an open A&E don't get you, the future plume fume from the incinerator won't be as good as oxygen.
[quote][p][bold]Krissi[/bold] wrote: last time I needed an ambulance I had been run over in Beddington- I was told the A&E at what was then Mayday was closed at 5pm- ok that was over 30 years ago but what happens if it is the same now, when St Helier's one has been taken away ?[/p][/quote]Never get run over in Beddington. If the long distance travel searching for an open A&E don't get you, the future plume fume from the incinerator won't be as good as oxygen. Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

3:55pm Fri 14 Sep 12

kazza76 says...

my daughter aged 14 became ill when she was 9 months old with bronchiolitis and was seriously ill, at the time we lived near st georges hospital, she was taken to st georges in the early hours of a december morning, we spent 3 hrs in a&e and were then blue lighted to another hospital due to lack of beds, the hospital we were diverted to is frimley park hospital approximately 35 miles from home. totally unacceptable with a seriously ill child, if st heliers goes exactly how far would we have to travel if kingston,croydon and st georges are full to capacity.
my daughter aged 14 became ill when she was 9 months old with bronchiolitis and was seriously ill, at the time we lived near st georges hospital, she was taken to st georges in the early hours of a december morning, we spent 3 hrs in a&e and were then blue lighted to another hospital due to lack of beds, the hospital we were diverted to is frimley park hospital approximately 35 miles from home. totally unacceptable with a seriously ill child, if st heliers goes exactly how far would we have to travel if kingston,croydon and st georges are full to capacity. kazza76
  • Score: 0

10:40pm Fri 14 Sep 12

Danny Bhoy says...

Krissi. For the last couple of years, victims of serious road traffic accidents have not been treated at St Helier. So you would not go there today, never mind in future!

You would go to the specialist major trauma centre at St George's. Since this unit was set up, it has transformed results for the better for people suffering major trauma. Many more people died before these services were centralised in specialist units. Same is true of stroke and heart attack. You would be taken to St George's now, regardless of what happens with BSBV and the A&E at St Helier.
Krissi. For the last couple of years, victims of serious road traffic accidents have not been treated at St Helier. So you would not go there today, never mind in future! You would go to the specialist major trauma centre at St George's. Since this unit was set up, it has transformed results for the better for people suffering major trauma. Many more people died before these services were centralised in specialist units. Same is true of stroke and heart attack. You would be taken to St George's now, regardless of what happens with BSBV and the A&E at St Helier. Danny Bhoy
  • Score: 0

10:34am Sat 15 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

Danny Bhoy wrote:
Krissi. For the last couple of years, victims of serious road traffic accidents have not been treated at St Helier. So you would not go there today, never mind in future!

You would go to the specialist major trauma centre at St George's. Since this unit was set up, it has transformed results for the better for people suffering major trauma. Many more people died before these services were centralised in specialist units. Same is true of stroke and heart attack. You would be taken to St George's now, regardless of what happens with BSBV and the A&E at St Helier.
See http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
2200339/NHS-Cuts--Sa
vage-consequences-re
vealed-pensioner-wai
ts-6-hours-ambulance
.html?openGraphAutho
r=%2Fhome%2Fsearch.h
tml%3Fs%3D%26authorn
amef%3DDavid%2BRose
[quote][p][bold]Danny Bhoy[/bold] wrote: Krissi. For the last couple of years, victims of serious road traffic accidents have not been treated at St Helier. So you would not go there today, never mind in future! You would go to the specialist major trauma centre at St George's. Since this unit was set up, it has transformed results for the better for people suffering major trauma. Many more people died before these services were centralised in specialist units. Same is true of stroke and heart attack. You would be taken to St George's now, regardless of what happens with BSBV and the A&E at St Helier.[/p][/quote]See http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2200339/NHS-Cuts--Sa vage-consequences-re vealed-pensioner-wai ts-6-hours-ambulance .html?openGraphAutho r=%2Fhome%2Fsearch.h tml%3Fs%3D%26authorn amef%3DDavid%2BRose Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

10:34am Sat 15 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

Danny Bhoy wrote:
Krissi. For the last couple of years, victims of serious road traffic accidents have not been treated at St Helier. So you would not go there today, never mind in future!

You would go to the specialist major trauma centre at St George's. Since this unit was set up, it has transformed results for the better for people suffering major trauma. Many more people died before these services were centralised in specialist units. Same is true of stroke and heart attack. You would be taken to St George's now, regardless of what happens with BSBV and the A&E at St Helier.
See http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
2200339/NHS-Cuts--Sa
vage-consequences-re
vealed-pensioner-wai
ts-6-hours-ambulance
.html?openGraphAutho
r=%2Fhome%2Fsearch.h
tml%3Fs%3D%26authorn
amef%3DDavid%2BRose
[quote][p][bold]Danny Bhoy[/bold] wrote: Krissi. For the last couple of years, victims of serious road traffic accidents have not been treated at St Helier. So you would not go there today, never mind in future! You would go to the specialist major trauma centre at St George's. Since this unit was set up, it has transformed results for the better for people suffering major trauma. Many more people died before these services were centralised in specialist units. Same is true of stroke and heart attack. You would be taken to St George's now, regardless of what happens with BSBV and the A&E at St Helier.[/p][/quote]See http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2200339/NHS-Cuts--Sa vage-consequences-re vealed-pensioner-wai ts-6-hours-ambulance .html?openGraphAutho r=%2Fhome%2Fsearch.h tml%3Fs%3D%26authorn amef%3DDavid%2BRose Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

11:01am Sat 15 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

There is some underhand management going on of which some of the public would not approve in the diversion of patients from their usual effective course.
On Monday 13th August 2012 I was collapsing with an acute febrile neutropenic sepsis event and my LAS code brought a wonderful paramedic response. I was taken as usual to St. Helier A&E where the three doctors and two nurses who helped me were as kind and competent as one could ever wish for.
I was on resus from 2-5am on four drips and oxygen and given heart, blood, urine, and x-ray tests. You couldn't fault it.
It all turned horrible when I was handed over to the new suped-up medics on the much vaunted medical assessment unit. All they wanted to do was get me out the door home. They worked in a super rush and did not take properly into account my previous history of 35 admissions when I was always transferred to my home haematology ward B1 in the hospital's excellent Whitfield Unit which has kept me going for 12 years. The MAU doctor said I could be discharged because my neutrophils were up to 3.7. I told him that could not be because they were only 1.7 and on the way down at the clinic appointment the previous week. A re-test subsequently showed them at 1.0. The non-haematology nurse had great trouble getting the blood which clotted in the tube. I repeated asked them to advise my haematology team I was in the hospital and they ignored me, a breach of hospital protocol. I asked for guidance whether I should take my due bone marrow stimulant injection and answer came there none.
After going through the trauma of the event, all night being worked on in A&E I was told to go for a walk and get a coffee and go home at 6pm. My drips which are normally continued for a few days in haematology were taken down.
I was told despite my infection index being elevated I could go home on tablets. At 6pm the team had gone home and a fresh team came on next morning so it felt like start again. I was so incensed I phone the switchboard from my bed and bleeped my clinical nurse specialist who kindly sent a senior haematologist over to review the case. It seems plain to me that the covert management ploy is to put these hyped up extra assessment teams in to kick patients out ever earlier and block their progress to their usual wards by not telling anyone. If this happens to you stand your ground and tell them you are not going anywhere until you feel well enough. St. Helier Hospital is the jewel in the crown of our local NHS. The new MAU is the fly in the ointment.
There is some underhand management going on of which some of the public would not approve in the diversion of patients from their usual effective course. On Monday 13th August 2012 I was collapsing with an acute febrile neutropenic sepsis event and my LAS code brought a wonderful paramedic response. I was taken as usual to St. Helier A&E where the three doctors and two nurses who helped me were as kind and competent as one could ever wish for. I was on resus from 2-5am on four drips and oxygen and given heart, blood, urine, and x-ray tests. You couldn't fault it. It all turned horrible when I was handed over to the new suped-up medics on the much vaunted medical assessment unit. All they wanted to do was get me out the door home. They worked in a super rush and did not take properly into account my previous history of 35 admissions when I was always transferred to my home haematology ward B1 in the hospital's excellent Whitfield Unit which has kept me going for 12 years. The MAU doctor said I could be discharged because my neutrophils were up to 3.7. I told him that could not be because they were only 1.7 and on the way down at the clinic appointment the previous week. A re-test subsequently showed them at 1.0. The non-haematology nurse had great trouble getting the blood which clotted in the tube. I repeated asked them to advise my haematology team I was in the hospital and they ignored me, a breach of hospital protocol. I asked for guidance whether I should take my due bone marrow stimulant injection and answer came there none. After going through the trauma of the event, all night being worked on in A&E I was told to go for a walk and get a coffee and go home at 6pm. My drips which are normally continued for a few days in haematology were taken down. I was told despite my infection index being elevated I could go home on tablets. At 6pm the team had gone home and a fresh team came on next morning so it felt like start again. I was so incensed I phone the switchboard from my bed and bleeped my clinical nurse specialist who kindly sent a senior haematologist over to review the case. It seems plain to me that the covert management ploy is to put these hyped up extra assessment teams in to kick patients out ever earlier and block their progress to their usual wards by not telling anyone. If this happens to you stand your ground and tell them you are not going anywhere until you feel well enough. St. Helier Hospital is the jewel in the crown of our local NHS. The new MAU is the fly in the ointment. Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

12:28pm Sat 15 Sep 12

Danny Bhoy says...

It's hard to take anything seriously in the Daily Mail tbh, but the bottom line is that London survival rates for stroke, trauma and heart attack have rocketed to the best in the country since they centralised them in specialist units. More specialists on hand round the clock means more lives saved, regardless of a slightly longer journey.
It's hard to take anything seriously in the Daily Mail tbh, but the bottom line is that London survival rates for stroke, trauma and heart attack have rocketed to the best in the country since they centralised them in specialist units. More specialists on hand round the clock means more lives saved, regardless of a slightly longer journey. Danny Bhoy
  • Score: 0

3:25pm Sat 15 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

Danny Bhoy wrote:
It's hard to take anything seriously in the Daily Mail tbh, but the bottom line is that London survival rates for stroke, trauma and heart attack have rocketed to the best in the country since they centralised them in specialist units. More specialists on hand round the clock means more lives saved, regardless of a slightly longer journey.
"Steps" the managment selectively spun propaganda sheet should be read with caution and with critical attennae switched on.
[quote][p][bold]Danny Bhoy[/bold] wrote: It's hard to take anything seriously in the Daily Mail tbh, but the bottom line is that London survival rates for stroke, trauma and heart attack have rocketed to the best in the country since they centralised them in specialist units. More specialists on hand round the clock means more lives saved, regardless of a slightly longer journey.[/p][/quote]"Steps" the managment selectively spun propaganda sheet should be read with caution and with critical attennae switched on. Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

10:30am Sun 16 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

Danny Bhoy wrote:
It's hard to take anything seriously in the Daily Mail tbh, but the bottom line is that London survival rates for stroke, trauma and heart attack have rocketed to the best in the country since they centralised them in specialist units. More specialists on hand round the clock means more lives saved, regardless of a slightly longer journey.
Please read the article on
http://www.dailymail

.co.uk/news/article-

2203809/A-E-shutdown

-farce-backlash-begi

ns.html
and consider printing the protest coupon, signing it and sending it to Jeremy Hunt the newly appointed Health Secretary now the Lansley disaster has been ousted. You will see this decimation of A&E Departments is a nationwide strategy causing endless suffering.
[quote][p][bold]Danny Bhoy[/bold] wrote: It's hard to take anything seriously in the Daily Mail tbh, but the bottom line is that London survival rates for stroke, trauma and heart attack have rocketed to the best in the country since they centralised them in specialist units. More specialists on hand round the clock means more lives saved, regardless of a slightly longer journey.[/p][/quote]Please read the article on http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2203809/A-E-shutdown -farce-backlash-begi ns.html and consider printing the protest coupon, signing it and sending it to Jeremy Hunt the newly appointed Health Secretary now the Lansley disaster has been ousted. You will see this decimation of A&E Departments is a nationwide strategy causing endless suffering. Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

10:45am Sun 16 Sep 12

Danny Bhoy says...

I did read it. There are just as many articles saying A&E is being used for the wrong reasons - sometimes completely bizarre ones. That costs lives.

A&E is for life-threatening emergencies only, anyone else should be seeing an out of hours GP or going to an urgent care centre.

The time it takes you to get to hospital is much less important than what greets you when you arrive. If it's a team of top specialists, you are much more likely to survive than if it's one top doctor and a few juniors, which is what you get when you spread staff too thinly across too many hospitals.
I did read it. There are just as many articles saying A&E is being used for the wrong reasons - sometimes completely bizarre ones. That costs lives. A&E is for life-threatening emergencies only, anyone else should be seeing an out of hours GP or going to an urgent care centre. The time it takes you to get to hospital is much less important than what greets you when you arrive. If it's a team of top specialists, you are much more likely to survive than if it's one top doctor and a few juniors, which is what you get when you spread staff too thinly across too many hospitals. Danny Bhoy
  • Score: 0

10:48am Sun 16 Sep 12

Danny Bhoy says...

And sorry, but you just can't dispute the data because it conflicts with your opinion! Survival rates are survival rates, there are national tables for this sort of thing. London has gone from the relegation zone to the top since it introduced specialist centres.

Most life-threatening things that can happen to you - heart attack, stroke or trauma - you would already be going to St George's as St Helier would not treat you.
And sorry, but you just can't dispute the data because it conflicts with your opinion! Survival rates are survival rates, there are national tables for this sort of thing. London has gone from the relegation zone to the top since it introduced specialist centres. Most life-threatening things that can happen to you - heart attack, stroke or trauma - you would already be going to St George's as St Helier would not treat you. Danny Bhoy
  • Score: 0

2:30pm Sun 16 Sep 12

Michael Pantlin says...

You can keep your distant St. George's Hospital. They had so many specialists looking after that patient in the headlines, so many brains on the job that each one left it to the rest to get him a drink of water and he died. That doesn't happen at our St. Helier District General Hospital which is convenient and local and easier to reach when you are unwell. I speak from 12 years experience of 36 admissions for life-threatening illness all dealt with superbly by the excellent haematology unit and ward B1 Whitfield Unit. Those are facts from first hand experience not some placedmen's theoretical report. The outcomes have been excellent for me against high odds so I'm still here to fight my corner to keep St. Helier uncut.
You can keep your distant St. George's Hospital. They had so many specialists looking after that patient in the headlines, so many brains on the job that each one left it to the rest to get him a drink of water and he died. That doesn't happen at our St. Helier District General Hospital which is convenient and local and easier to reach when you are unwell. I speak from 12 years experience of 36 admissions for life-threatening illness all dealt with superbly by the excellent haematology unit and ward B1 Whitfield Unit. Those are facts from first hand experience not some placedmen's theoretical report. The outcomes have been excellent for me against high odds so I'm still here to fight my corner to keep St. Helier uncut. Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

5:04pm Sun 16 Sep 12

Danny Bhoy says...

So one guy's anecdote trumps actual results?! That's crazy. Trying to keep 4 A&Es in this part of London costs lives.

I would imagine some of that care you describe would continue at St Helier anyway, though I may be wrong.
So one guy's anecdote trumps actual results?! That's crazy. Trying to keep 4 A&Es in this part of London costs lives. I would imagine some of that care you describe would continue at St Helier anyway, though I may be wrong. Danny Bhoy
  • Score: 0

8:51pm Wed 19 Sep 12

kazza76 says...

@ Danny Bhoy not everyone has the means to get to st georges especially if they are elderly or do not drive, I have 2 children and live near st heliers why should I have to trek miles to another hospital. it is not one guys anecdote, are you going to argue with the 500+ people that came to the save st helier family funday to show there support for keeping our services or are you going to agree with the BSBV who clearly talk out of thier backsides and are made up of a bunch of snobby drs with private medical insurance who get treated at private hospitals, not giving a sod about anyone else, I am sick to the back teeth of people banging on about how good st georges is all the time its about time people locally got off thier butt and supported our local hospital coz when its gone you will be well and truely stuffed!!!!!!!!!!!
@ Danny Bhoy not everyone has the means to get to st georges especially if they are elderly or do not drive, I have 2 children and live near st heliers why should I have to trek miles to another hospital. it is not one guys anecdote, are you going to argue with the 500+ people that came to the save st helier family funday to show there support for keeping our services or are you going to agree with the BSBV who clearly talk out of thier backsides and are made up of a bunch of snobby drs with private medical insurance who get treated at private hospitals, not giving a sod about anyone else, I am sick to the back teeth of people banging on about how good st georges is all the time its about time people locally got off thier butt and supported our local hospital coz when its gone you will be well and truely stuffed!!!!!!!!!!! kazza76
  • Score: 0

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