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Now showing at Cineworld Chelsea 279,Kings Road,Chelsea,London,London SW3 5EW 0871 200 2000

  • A Most Violent Year
  • Inherent Vice
  • Into The Woods
  • Kingsman: The Secret Service
  • The Gambler
  • The Theory Of Everything
  • Trash

A Most Violent Year 4 stars

movie title

Abel Morales owns a fleet of oil transport trucks that carry valuable fuel to customers across the city. One of his trucks is hijacked and the driver Julian is been badly beaten. Threats to Abel's livelihood become personal, targeting his children and wife Anna, whose gangster father used to own the company. "Let me deal with this," pleads Abel. "You better," she retorts. "Because you won't like what's going to happen once I start getting involved."

  • GenreAction, Drama, Romance, Thriller
  • CastJessica Chastain, Oscar Isaac, David Oyelowo, Alessandro Nivola, Elyes Gabel, Albert Brooks.
  • DirectorJ C Chandor.
  • WriterJ C Chandor.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration125 mins
  • Official site
  • Release23/01/2015

According to statistics, 1981 was the most violent year in New York City history in relation to the population. Over the 12 months, more than 1.2 million crimes were recorded including 60,000 aggravated assaults, 5,400 forcible rapes and 2,220 murders.

A crack epidemic had the city in a chokehold and Mayor Ed Koch seemed powerless to curb gang warfare and spiralling lawlessness on the subway system. Writer-director JC Chandor, who was Oscar nominated for the 2012 thriller Margin Call, uses this turbulent period as a backdrop to his masterful and searing portrait of crime and brutal punishment.

Centred on a married couple, who are struggling to keep their heating oil distribution business afloat, A Most Violent Year powerfully conveys the personal and professional sacrifices of a devoted husband and wife, who become one of the shocking statistics.

The film's pacing is deceptively steady and slow, lulling us into a false sense of security as Chandor ups the stakes for his beautifully sketched characters, forcing them to take greater risks to protect their nearest and dearest.

Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) owns a fleet of oil transport trucks that carry valuable fuel to customers across the city. He's a small player but hopes to expand by clinching a deal for property on the Brooklyn waterfront that will allow him to take delivery of oil from the river. Having put down 700,000 US dollars as a deposit, Abel has just 30 days to close the transaction or the vendor keeps the downpayment and can sell the land to a competitor.

Soon after, Abel learns that one of his trucks has been hijacked and the driver Julian (Elyes Gabel) has been badly beaten. Union rep Bill O'Leary (Peter Gerety) asks Abel to allow the drivers to carry unlicenced guns as a deterrent but the boss strongly objects, knowing that it will take just one stray bullet to arouse the suspicions of the crusading Assistant District Attorney (David Oyelowo).

Threats to Abel's livelihood become personal, targeting his children and wife Anna (Jessica Chastain), whose gangster father used to own the company.
"Let me deal with this," pleads Abel.
"You better," she retorts. "Because you won't like what's going to happen once I start getting involved."

A Most Violent Year hits a sweet spot on every level, from Chandor's measured direction and lean script, to the powerhouse performances. Isaac is mesmerising as an honourable family man, who refuses to sink to the depths of some of his rivals, sticking to the path of righteousness for as long as he dare.

Chastain essays another ballsy woman of substance, cutting through her husband's rose-tinted idealism with harsh home truths. When oblivion beckons for Abel and Anna, we discover the true strength of their moral compasses in the face of the corruption and senseless bloodshed.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 31st January 2015
Sunday 1st February 2015
Monday 2nd February 2015
Tuesday 3rd February 2015
Wednesday 4th February 2015
Thursday 5th February 2015

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Inherent Vice 3 stars

movie title

Larry "Doc" Sportello is a private eye and hippie, who lives in a ramshackle house on Gordita Beach. Alluring old flame Shasta Fay Hepworth returns unexpectedly to beg Doc's help tracking down her new beau, billionaire land developer Michael Z Wolfman. Shasta claims Wolfman has been kidnapped and consigned to a mental institution by his money-grabbing wife. Doc takes on the case and intrigue piles upon deception as unearths the truth about Wolfman's disappearance.

  • GenreAdaptation, Comedy, Drama, Romance, Thriller
  • CastOwen Wilson, Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, Katherine Waterston, Reese Witherspoon.
  • DirectorPaul Thomas Anderson.
  • WriterPaul Thomas Anderson.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration149 mins
  • Official sitewww.inherentvicemovie.com
  • Release30/01/2015

Somewhere in the psychedelic haze of pot fumes that shroud Inherent Vice, there is a groovy slice of California noir spluttering to be seen and heard. Patient audiences, who indulge the whims of writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson will be rewarded with a hallucinogenic crime caper crammed with quirky characters including another eye-catching lead performance from Joaquin Phoenix.

However, Anderson doesn't make it easy to fall in love with his picture. Pacing is deliberately pedestrian and the running time, one puff shy of two-and-a-half hours, is a test of mental and physical endurance.

His script, adapted from Thomas Pynchon's novel of the same name, demands constant attention. Very little happens over the course of the 149 minutes but Anderson presents the narrative as an almighty tangle of convoluted plots threads. Take a toilet break at your peril.

Larry "Doc" Sportello (Phoenix) is a private eye and hippie, who lives in a ramshackle house on Gordita Beach and occasionally drifts into an office he rents, replete with a sassy receptionist (Maya Rudolph).

Alluring old flame Shasta Fay Hepworth (Katherine Waterston) returns unexpectedly to beg Doc's help tracking down her new beau, billionaire land developer Michael Z Wolfman (Eric Roberts). "She was laying some heavy combination of face ingredients on Doc that he couldn't read," explains the rambling voiceover that accompanies this drug-fuelled lunacy.

Shasta claims Wolfman has been kidnapped and consigned to a mental institution by his money-grabbing wife (Serena Scott Thomas). Doc takes on the case and also agrees two further assignments: to help Hope Harlingen (Jena Malone) track down her missing saxophonist husband (Owen Wilson), and reunite Black Guerrilla Family member Tariq Kahlil (Michael K Williams) with a wayward bodyguard (Christopher Allen Nelson), who owes him money.

The trails lead to a massage parlour where Jade (Hong Chau) tells Doc to "beware of the Golden Fang". Intrigue piles upon deception and Doc seeks guidance from sexy Deputy District Attorney Penny Kimball (Reese Witherspoon) and bullying local cop, Lieutenant Detective Christian F "Bigfoot" Bjornsen (Josh Brolin).

Inherent Vice is the first film adaptation of Pynchon's kaleidoscopic oeuvre and it's easy to see why filmmakers have steered well clear. Anderson does an admirable job conveying the freewheeling attitudes and paranoia of the era without tying himself completely in narrative knots.

Phoenix seems to be having a blast throughout and colourful supporting turns, including Martin Short as a drug-snorting dentist with wandering hands, churns the underlying black comedy.

That menagerie of dopers, musicians, hustlers, white supremacists and surfers is bewildering and Anderson regularly introduces new characters to keep our brains as scrambled as his bewildered hero. Inherent Vice is a trip - whether the multiplex masses will want to embark on this journey into the criminal underbelly of neon-lit 1970s L.A. is open to debate.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 31st January 2015
Sunday 1st February 2015
Monday 2nd February 2015
Tuesday 3rd February 2015
Wednesday 4th February 2015
Thursday 5th February 2015

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Into The Woods 4 stars

movie title

The Baker and his wife yearn for a child but cannot conceive. The Witch, who lives next door, promises the couple their heart's desire if they bring her four objects before the next blue moon: a cow as white as milk, a cape as red as blood, hair as yellow as corn, and a slipper as pure as gold. As the fated hour approaches, the Baker and his wife resort to increasingly desperate measures to source the objects.

  • GenreAdaptation, Comedy, Drama, Family, Family, Fantasy, Musical, Romance
  • CastChris Pine, Anna Kendrick, Meryl Streep, Mackenzie Mauzy, Billy Magnussen, Emily Blunt, James Corden, Daniel Huttlestone, Tracey Ullman, Johnny Depp, Lilla Crawford.
  • DirectorRob Marshall.
  • WriterStephen Sondheim, James Lapine.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration125 mins
  • Official sitewww.movies.disney.com/into-the-woods
  • Release09/01/2015

Traditionally in fairytales, the bedraggled heroine wins her dashing prince, evil stepmothers get their comeuppance and abducted children escape the clutches of a witch by pushing the treacherous hag into her oven. Nothing epitomises Happily Ever After like the heady aroma of roasting human flesh.

Into The Woods keeps turning the pages on these archetypal characters, imagining what might happen as they come to terms with their actions and - in most cases - suffer the repercussions.

Light comedy and heartrending tragedy skip hand in hand in James Lapine's screenplay and Stephen Sondheim's music and lyrics, which are ambrosia for director Rob Marshall, who propelled the 2002 film version of Chicago to Oscar glory.

This has nearly as much razzle dazzle including gorgeous costumes, picturesque sets and digitally enhanced magical effects. Thankfully, Marshall tones down the swirling camerawork and snappy editing here, adopting a gentler rhythm, which is less exhausting on our eyes over two hours.

The Baker (James Corden) and his wife (Emily Blunt) yearn for a child but cannot conceive. The Witch (Meryl Streep) next door promises the couple a family if they bring her four objects before the blue moon: a cow as white as milk, a cape as red as blood, hair as yellow as corn, and a slipper as pure as gold.

The Baker and his wife head into the woods with six magic beans and encounter 12-year-old Jack (Daniel Huttlestone), who is off to market to sell his cow Milky White, Cinderella (Anna Kendrick), who is fleeing from a ball thrown by a charming Prince (Chris Pine), Little Red Riding Hood (Lilla Crawford), who intends to visit her Granny (Annette Crosbie) but would make a tasty snack for the lascivious Wolf (Johnny Depp), and Rapunzel (Mackenzie Mauzy), who is consigned to a tower which can only be accessed by lowering her flaxen hair to a smitten lover (Billy Magnusson).

As the fated hour approaches, the childless couple resorts to desperate measures to collect the objects for the Witch.

Into The Woods establishes its mood with a dazzling overture, "I Wish", elegantly introducing the characters before their fates intersect. Streep is typically spellbinding. Her voice soars and our hearts break in her solo to motherhood, "Stay With Me".

Corden and Blunt add to the film's emotional heft while Pine and Magnusson are hysterical as regal brothers in their chest-beating, thigh-slapping duet "Agony" atop a cascading waterfall. With such a large cast to juggle, the script occasionally feels disjointed and some gear changes from broad pantomime to heartbreaking grief are jarring.

But Marshall doesn't shy away from delivering bitter pills in the final act courtesy of a marauding giant (Frances de la Tour). Everything has a price, especially your heart's desire, so be careful what you wish for.

Kingsman: The Secret Service 3 stars

movie title

Gary Unwin, who is known to his friends as Eggsy, is on the downward spiral to drugs and crime. He is dismissed as a hopeless cause by everyone except agent Harry Hart, who believes Eggsy would make an excellent crime-fighting operative. So Hart takes Eggsy under his wing and enrols the young man in a gruelling training programme against more eloquent and refined peers.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Comedy
  • CastColin Firth, Taron Egerton, Michael Caine, Mark Strong, Jack Davenport, Samuel L Jackson, Tom Prior, Mark Hamill.
  • DirectorMatthew Vaughn.
  • WriterMatthew Vaughn, Jane Goldman.
  • CountryUS/UK
  • Duration129 mins
  • Official sitewww.kingsmanmovie.com
  • Release29/01/2015

Directed at full pelt by Matthew Vaughn, Kingsman: The Secret Service is an outrageous James Bond-esque caper with an unpleasant and sadistic streak. This hare-brained tale about a secret organisation of impeccably tailored British agents dedicated to world peace lampoons the conventions of the spy genre with an arched eyebrow.

"Nowadays, they're all a little serious for my taste," opines Colin Firth's lead operative about modern-day spy films, one of several self-referential winks in Vaughn and Jane Goldman's script. "Give me a far-fetched plot any day," he quips, and that's just what Kingsman delivers in spades.

Unfortunately, the film also serves up a blitzkrieg of gratuitous on-screen barbarity. The violence doesn't support the plot, the plot is constructed to support as much wanton carnage as Vaughn can cram into each frame.

This stomach-churning slaughter reaches a nauseating crescendo in a Southern church where Firth's good guy squares off against a congregation of brain-washed bigots, racists and homophobes, who apparently deserve to die in lurid close-up while Lynyrd Skynyrd's Free Bird strums on the soundtrack. The film was cut by UK censors to secure a 15 certificate but I wouldn't want my nephews, if they were 15 or 16, anywhere near Vaughn's giddy bloodbath.

Gary Unwin (Taron Egerton), who is known to friends as Eggsy, is on a downward spiral despite an impressive IQ. He is powerless to stop his mother Michelle (Samantha Womack) suffering abuse from her boyfriend (Geoff Bell), and a spot of joy-riding leads to a brief stay in a police cell.

Eggsy is dismissed as a hopeless cause by everyone except dapper secret agent Harry Hart (Colin Firth), who believes the young man has untapped potential as a crime-fighter. So Hart enrols Eggsy in a gruelling training programme against sneering posh lads Charlie (Edward Holcroft), Barnaby (Matthew William Jones) and Hugo (Tom Prior), and friendlier rivals Grace (Sophie Cookson) and Roxy (Alisha Heng).

The recruits test their strength and guile in a series of challenges devised by gadget geek Merlin (Mark Strong). Against the odds, Eggsy shines brighter than some of the supposed creme de la creme and when technological wizard Valentine (Samuel L Jackson) and his blade runner henchwoman Gazelle (Sofia Boutella) threaten mankind with a radical solution to climate change, Eggsy puts his training to good use alongside his stiff upper-lipped mentor.

Kingsman: The Secret Service leaves an exceedingly nasty taste in the mouth that is difficult to shake, garnished with crude sexism in the closing frames. Firth is a debonair action hero, contrasting sharply with Egerton's bad boy from the wrong side of the tracks.

Jackson has fun with his lisping megalomaniac, who gags at the sight of blood. If we did the same watching Vaughn's undeniably stylish film, we'd all need urgent medical assistance inside the first 20 minutes.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 31st January 2015
Sunday 1st February 2015
Monday 2nd February 2015
Tuesday 3rd February 2015
Wednesday 4th February 2015
Thursday 5th February 2015

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The Gambler 3 stars

movie title

College professor Jim Bennett loses at the blackjack table in an underground den run by one of his creditors, Mister Lee, leaving Jim with seven days to find 240,000 US dollars. Without enough money to stake at a table, Jim borrows 50,000 US dollars from Neville Baraka and also turns to his mother for help. A further loan from a hulking gangster called Frank gives Jim the collateral he needs to gamble himself back into the black.

  • GenreDrama, Romance, Thriller
  • CastMark Wahlberg, John Goodman, Jessica Lange, Brie Larson.
  • DirectorRupert Wyatt.
  • WriterWilliam Monahan.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration111 mins
  • Official sitewww.thegamblermovie.com
  • Release23/01/2015

Silence is golden for everyone except American screenwriter William Monahan. With an Oscar on the mantelpiece for The Departed, his English language reworking of the Hong Kong thriller Infernal Affairs, the Massachusetts-born scribe attempts a similar feat of alchemy with this modern update to the 1974 film of the same name directed by Karel Reisz.

Alas, Monahan's penchant for excessively wordy set pieces proves an insurmountable distraction. He arms the cast with polished one-liners and barbed retorts that would draw blood if his woe-begotten characters weren't so emotionally cold and distant.

After the first hour of endless verbosity, I hoped - in vain as it transpired - that Monahan would rein in the dialogue and let actions speak a hundred words instead. No such luck. But then good fortune is in perilously short supply in Rupert Wyatt's film, which unfolds through the bloodshot eyes of a college professor, whose daredevil antics at the blackjack table have left him heavily in debt to men who trade in violence.

From the moody opening frames, all bets are off whether the eponymous gambler will end his losing streak and evade a knee-capping - or something worse. The misery begins with Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) striding into an underground den run by one of his creditors, Mister Lee (Alvin Ing).

The night ends badly, as usual, leaving Jim with seven days to find 240,000 US dollars. "Get me my money," threatens Mister Lee. Without enough money to stake at a table, Jim borrows 50,000 US dollars from Neville Baraka (Michael Kenneth Williams) and also turns to his mother (Jessica Lange). "I don't want to understand the nature of your problem. I just want you not to have it," she snarls.

A further loan from a hulking gangster called Frank (John Goodman) gives Jim the collateral he needs to gamble himself back into the black. Meanwhile, Jim spars with his students and sparks an affair with his most talented pupil, Amy (Brie Larson).

As time runs out for Jim to settle his spiralling debts, Neville issues a stark warning: "I'm going to kill that pretty little blonde girl, mail you the pictures, and kill you next."

The Gambler stakes everything on Monahan's screenplay and incurs losses. Wahlberg is elevated by the material but those long speeches, including a centrepiece rant in the lecture theatre, become wearisome.

He verbally jousts with Lange in fiery form as a matriarch who is sick of hauling her son out of the mire. Larson is shamefully underused in an underwritten supporting role.

Director Wyatt should crank up tension every time Jim sits down at a card table. Instead, we savour the momentary silence as the lead character stops philosophising to concentrate on the deck.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 31st January 2015
Sunday 1st February 2015
Monday 2nd February 2015
Tuesday 3rd February 2015
Wednesday 4th February 2015
Thursday 5th February 2015

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The Theory Of Everything 4 stars

movie title

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking falls head over heels in love with English literature student Jane Wilde at 1960s Cambridge University. Their fledgling romance is tested by his diagnosis with motor neurone disease. Stephen's parents Frank and Isobel try to warn Jane off their son, fearful of emotional devastation that will be wrought if he dies within the two years predicted by doctors. However, she defies everyone, determined to love Stephen for as long as they are together.

  • GenreAdaptation, Biography, Drama, Romance
  • CastEddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones, Charlie Cox, Emily Watson, Simon McBurney, David Thewlis.
  • DirectorJames Marsh.
  • WriterAnthony McCarten.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration123 mins
  • Official site
  • Release01/01/2015

In Scottish novelist JM Barrie's most beloved work, Peter Pan famously contemplates his mortality on Marooner's Rock and observes, "To die will be an awfully big adventure". For more than half a century since he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has - happily - pushed aside his awfully big adventure and astounded the medical community.

Defying the short life expectancy associated with the rare condition, he has married twice, raised a family and altered our narrow perception of the universe including the publication of his worldwide bestseller, A Brief History Of Time.

As Hawking remarked at a press conference in 2006, "However bad life may seem, there is always something you can do, and succeed at. While there's life, there is hope." Those inspirational words are repeated verbatim in The Theory Of Everything.

Based on the memoir Travelling To Infinity by Jane Wilde Hawking, James Marsh's deeply moving drama charts the romance of Stephen (Eddie Redmayne) and first wife Jane (Felicity Jones) from fleeting glances at a party at mid-1960s Cambridge University through their subsequent battle against MND.

Stephen's parents Frank (Simon McBurney) and Isobel (Abigail Cruttenden) initially warn Jane off their son, fearful of the emotional devastation that will be wrought if he dies within the two years predicted by doctors. "It's not going to be a fight, Jane. It's going to be a very heavy defeat, for all of us," laments Frank.

Love must find a way and Jane defies everyone, even a pessimistic Stephen, to stand beside her soul mate. "I want us to be together, for as long as we've got," she tells him. "If that's not very long then - well, that's just how it is."

Her resolve inspires Stephen to continue his search for "one single elegant equation to explain everything". Aided by choirmaster Jonathan Jones (Charlie Cox) and carer Elaine Mason (Maxine Peake), Jane raises the couple's three children and holds their marriage together.

The Theory Of Everything is anchored by two of the year's best performances. Redmayne is simply astounding, affecting a mesmerising physical transformation that surely warrants an Oscar. He brilliantly conveys every raw emotion or flash of impish humour with his eyes or the twitch of a facial muscle.

Jones is equally compelling as his soul mate, who sacrifices everything in the name of love. The scene in which she finally acknowledges hard-fought defeat to save the relationship and tearfully tells Stephen, "I have loved you... I did my best," is heartbreaking.

Director Marsh uses simple visual motifs to illuminate the complex cosmology, such as a swirl of cream in a cup of coffee to represent a spiral galaxy in Stephen's mind. With its delicate balance of tear-stained drama, deeply felt romance and comedy, The Theory Of Everything hits upon a winning formula.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 31st January 2015
Sunday 1st February 2015
Monday 2nd February 2015
Tuesday 3rd February 2015
Wednesday 4th February 2015
Thursday 5th February 2015

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Trash 3 stars

movie title

Shortly before he is arrested and tortured, Jose Angelo flings a wallet into a passing garbage truck, which is destined for the local tip. Among the throng of children scavenging the tip for plastics is Raphael, who finds the wallet and secretly shares the contents with best friend Gardo. When cops led by police inspector Frederico descend on the site, promising a handsome reward for the wallet, the boys realise the precariousness of their situation.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Drama, Thriller
  • CastWagner Moura, Rooney Mara, Martin Sheen, Selton Mello, Rickson Tevez, Gabriel Weinstein, Eduardo Luiz.
  • DirectorStephen Daldry.
  • WriterRichard Curtis.
  • CountryUK/Bra
  • Duration114 mins
  • Official site
  • Release30/01/2015

It's a matter of conjecture whether revered comedian WC Fields told his peers to never work with animals or children. Regardless of the provenance, British director Stephen Daldry has ignored the sage advice and taken on projects that demand powerhouse performances from inexperienced performers.

In 2000, he worked closely with newcomer Jamie Bell on Billy Elliot, guiding his young star to a BAFTA as Best Actor. A decade later, he performed similar miracles in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, wringing tears from 12-year-old Thomas Horn as a socially awkward boy haunted by the death of his father in the September 11 attacks.

Daldry's talent for identifying and skilfully nurturing raw talent is in evidence again in Trash. Based on Andy Mulligan's novel, which has been adapted for the screen by Richard Curtis, this rousing tale of courage in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro is blessed with luminous performances from non-professionals Rickson Tevez, Eduardo Luiz and Gabriel Weinstein.

Combining the gritty setting of City Of God with the life-affirming cheer of Slumdog Millionaire, Daldry's film is an undeniable crowd-pleaser. While the plot ultimately falls apart in the final act, the teenage protagonists light up every frame.

Shortly before he is arrested and tortured, Jose Angelo (Wagner Moura) flings a wallet into a passing garbage truck, which is destined for the local tip. Among the throng of children scavenging the tip for plastics is Raphael (Rickson Tevez), who finds the wallet and secretly shares the contents with best friend Gardo (Eduardo Luiz).

When cops led by police inspector Frederico (Selton Mello) descend on the site, promising a handsome reward for the wallet, the boys realise the precariousness of their situation. They seek out pint-sized outcast Rato (Gabriel Weinstein), who lives in the sewers, and he leads a merry dance to a locker in the city centre, which is the first clue to a conspiracy involving mayoral hopeful Antonio Santos (Stepan Nercessian).

Unable to trust the authorities, the boys turn to Father Juilliard (Martin Sheen), who runs the local ministry and his plucky assistant Olivia (Rooney Mara) but they are no match for Federico and his thuggish men.

Trash is anything but emotionally manipulative rubbish but Daldry's film does fall short of the emotional wallop promised in heart-breaking opening scenes. Tevez, Luiz and Weinstein are naturals in front of the camera, sharing palpable screen chemistry that compels us to root for the boys against Mello's sadistic cop.

Rooney is underused while Sheen lends a warm, avuncular glow to his alcohol-swilling man of the cloth, who advises Olivia to keep her nose out of the boy's affairs. "Don't waste your life fighting battles that make you bitter or make you dead," he sermonises. It would be a dull denouement if she listened.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 31st January 2015
Sunday 1st February 2015
Monday 2nd February 2015
Tuesday 3rd February 2015
Wednesday 4th February 2015
Thursday 5th February 2015

This film is also showing at:

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