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What's On

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Now showing at Cineworld Chelsea 279,Kings Road,Chelsea,London,London SW3 5EW 0871 200 2000

  • Captain America: Civil War
  • Captain America: Civil War 3D
  • Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Robinson Crusoe
  • The Jungle Book
  • The Man Who Knew Infinity

Captain America: Civil War 4 stars

The US political establishment insists on the introduction of legislation to control the Avengers. Tony Stark aka Iron Man submits to these demands but Steve Rogers aka Captain America, who has always been a staunch patriot and followed orders, refuses to accede, especially when his good friend Bucky Barnes aka Winter Soldier is threatened. The gulf between Stark and Rogers forces the remaining Avengers to take sides. A battle royale unfolds just as a diabolical new enemy emerges and threatens mankind.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastChris Evans, Elizabeth Olsen, Scarlett Johansson, Robert Downey Jr, Paul Bettany, Paul Rudd, Don Cheadle.
  • DirectorJoe Russo, Anthony Russo.
  • WriterStephen McFeely, Christopher Markus.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration147 mins
  • Official sitewww.marvel.com/captainamerica
  • Release29/04/2016

The fragile alliance between the Avengers is shattered in the third Captain America film, directed at a breathless pace by brothers Joe and Anthony Russo. Opening with a flashback to 1991 that sets one major character on their self-destructive path, Civil War underscores its bombastic title by pitting former allies against each other in a series of dizzying showdowns that cleave apart the Marvel Comics universe. Scriptwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely repeatedly inhabit the blurred lines between heroism and villainy, examining the moral conundrums faced by superpowered warriors who have pledged to protect the innocent from the righteous crossfire. Alas, no one emerges unscathed from the melee and the deep psychological wounds inflicted in these bombastic 147 minutes suggest that this muscular chapter signals a bittersweet end for some characters while blatantly teeing up standalone spin-offs for Spider-Man and Black Panther. "Victory at the expense of the innocent is no victory at all," solemnly intones King T'Chaka (John Kani) from the battle-scarred nation of Wakanda. If that is true then Captain America: Civil War is a crushing defeat for everyone except thrill-seeking cinema audiences. A year has passed since the events of Avengers: Age Of Ultron and the US Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross (William Hurt) insists on the introduction of legislation - The Sokovia Accords - to control the superheroes. Tony Stark, aka Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr), reluctantly submits, telling his compatriots: "I'm doing what has to be done to stave off something worse." Steve Rogers, aka Captain America (Chris Evans), who has always been a staunch patriot, refuses to sign, fearful of the consequences of the Avengers relinquishing their independence. The gulf between Stark and Rogers forces the remaining Avengers to take sides. Natasha Romanoff, aka Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), James Rhodes, aka War Machine (Don Cheadle), Vision (Paul Bettany), Prince T'Challa, aka Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), and Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man (Tom Holland) all stand shoulder to shoulder with Stark. Meanwhile, Bucky Barnes, aka Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan), Sam Wilson, aka Falcon (Anthony Mackie), Wanda Maximoff, aka Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), Clint Barton, aka Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) and Scott Lang, aka Ant-Man (Paul Rudd), pledge their allegiance to Rogers. A battle royale between the two factions unfolds just as a diabolical new enemy, Baron Zemo (Daniel Bruhl), threatens mankind. Captain America: Civil War could easily trim 20 minutes from its bloated running time without diminishing the impact of the special effects sequences or the pivotal plot twists. The Russo brothers choreograph destruction on a grand scale, including an adrenaline-pumping motorcycle chase on the rubble-strewn streets of Berlin. Evans and Downey Jr puff out their chests for supremacy in every lavish frame, while Johansson somersaults sexily between the feuding factions. A protracted sequence involving Stark, a nerdy Peter Parker and Aunt May (Marisa Tomei) sows seeds of hope that next year's reboot, Spider-Man: Homecoming, might revitalise the webslinging vigilante with whip-smart humour. Miracles might happen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 7th May 2016
Sunday 8th May 2016
Monday 9th May 2016
Tuesday 10th May 2016
Wednesday 11th May 2016
Thursday 12th May 2016

This film is also showing at:

Captain America: Civil War 3D 4 stars

The US political establishment insists on the introduction of legislation to control the Avengers. Tony Stark aka Iron Man submits to these demands but Steve Rogers aka Captain America, who has always been a staunch patriot and followed orders, refuses to accede, especially when his good friend Bucky Barnes aka Winter Soldier is threatened. The gulf between Stark and Rogers forces the remaining Avengers to take sides. A battle royale unfolds just as a diabolical new enemy emerges and threatens mankind.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastChris Evans, Elizabeth Olsen, Scarlett Johansson.
  • DirectorJoe Russo, Anthony Russo.
  • WriterStephen McFeely, Christopher Markus.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration147 mins
  • Official sitewww.marvel.com/captainamerica
  • Release29/04/2016

The fragile alliance between the Avengers is shattered in the third Captain America film, directed at a breathless pace by brothers Joe and Anthony Russo. Opening with a flashback to 1991 that sets one major character on their self-destructive path, Civil War underscores its bombastic title by pitting former allies against each other in a series of dizzying showdowns that cleave apart the Marvel Comics universe. Scriptwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely repeatedly inhabit the blurred lines between heroism and villainy, examining the moral conundrums faced by superpowered warriors who have pledged to protect the innocent from the righteous crossfire. Alas, no one emerges unscathed from the melee and the deep psychological wounds inflicted in these bombastic 147 minutes suggest that this muscular chapter signals a bittersweet end for some characters while blatantly teeing up standalone spin-offs for Spider-Man and Black Panther. "Victory at the expense of the innocent is no victory at all," solemnly intones King T'Chaka (John Kani) from the battle-scarred nation of Wakanda. If that is true then Captain America: Civil War is a crushing defeat for everyone except thrill-seeking cinema audiences. A year has passed since the events of Avengers: Age Of Ultron and the US Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross (William Hurt) insists on the introduction of legislation - The Sokovia Accords - to control the superheroes. Tony Stark, aka Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr), reluctantly submits, telling his compatriots: "I'm doing what has to be done to stave off something worse." Steve Rogers, aka Captain America (Chris Evans), who has always been a staunch patriot, refuses to sign, fearful of the consequences of the Avengers relinquishing their independence. The gulf between Stark and Rogers forces the remaining Avengers to take sides. Natasha Romanoff, aka Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), James Rhodes, aka War Machine (Don Cheadle), Vision (Paul Bettany), Prince T'Challa, aka Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), and Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man (Tom Holland) all stand shoulder to shoulder with Stark. Meanwhile, Bucky Barnes, aka Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan), Sam Wilson, aka Falcon (Anthony Mackie), Wanda Maximoff, aka Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), Clint Barton, aka Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) and Scott Lang, aka Ant-Man (Paul Rudd), pledge their allegiance to Rogers. A battle royale between the two factions unfolds just as a diabolical new enemy, Baron Zemo (Daniel Bruhl), threatens mankind. Captain America: Civil War could easily trim 20 minutes from its bloated running time without diminishing the impact of the special effects sequences or the pivotal plot twists. The Russo brothers choreograph destruction on a grand scale, including an adrenaline-pumping motorcycle chase on the rubble-strewn streets of Berlin. Evans and Downey Jr puff out their chests for supremacy in every lavish frame, while Johansson somersaults sexily between the feuding factions. A protracted sequence involving Stark, a nerdy Peter Parker and Aunt May (Marisa Tomei) sows seeds of hope that next year's reboot, Spider-Man: Homecoming, might revitalise the webslinging vigilante with whip-smart humour. Miracles might happen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 7th May 2016
Sunday 8th May 2016
Monday 9th May 2016
Tuesday 10th May 2016
Wednesday 11th May 2016
Thursday 12th May 2016

This film is also showing at:

Florence Foster Jenkins 4 stars

Amateur operatic soprano Florence Foster Jenkins is determined to further her musical ambitions with the help of her second husband and doting companion, St Clair. The couple auditions several accompanists and Cosme Moon lands the position of Florence's pianist. The grand dame pays Cosme well and he gradually falls under his wealthy employer's spell, acknowledging that she is just following her dream, like everyone else.

  • GenreBiography, Comedy, Drama, Historical/Period, Musical, Romance
  • CastMeryl Streep, Hugh Grant, Simon Helberg, Rebecca Ferguson.
  • DirectorStephen Frears.
  • WriterNicholas Martin.
  • CountryUK/Fr
  • Duration110 mins
  • Official site
  • Release06/05/2016

Auditions for televised talent shows throw up a limitless supply of deluded wannabes, who refuse to let a lack of musicality or rhythm hamper their quest for pop superstardom. Occasionally, these lovable misfits strike a chord because of their unfettered enthusiasm - witness the inexorable rise of The Cheeky Girls and Jedward. Amateur operatic soprano Florence Foster Jenkins was one such endearing eccentric, who became a cause celebre in 1930s and 1940s New York precisely because she was unable to hold a note during her infamous recitals of Verdi, Brahms and Mozart. Recordings of her caterwauling became collector's items and her concerts were always sold out. Jenkins brought joy to millions and remained convinced of her soaring abilities until her glorious end, aged 76. This real-life story of triumph against sniggering cynicism provides rich inspiration for Stephen Frears' rollicking comedy drama. Anchored by tour-de-force performances from Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant that perfectly harmonise humour and pathos, Florence Foster Jenkins is an unabashedly joyful period piece that stands resolutely behind the eponymous socialite as she massacres the Laughing Song from Die Fledermaus or the Queen Of The Night aria from The Magic Flute. As the heroine remarks, "People may say I couldn't sing but no one can say I didn't sing." Florence (Streep) is determined to further her musical ambitions with the help of her second husband and doting companion, St Clair (Grant). "I shall need a pianist. Someone young, someone with passion!" declares Florence excitedly. The couple auditions several accompanists but they fail to meet Florence's exacting standards. "He's raping my ears. Make him stop!" she pleads after one hopeful tinkles the ivories. Cosme Moon (Simon Helberg) eventually lands the position of Florence's pianist and his first experience of Florence in full voice is played for tear-streaming belly laughs by Frears. The grand dame pays Cosme well and he gradually falls under his wealthy employer's spell, acknowledging that she is just following her dream, like everyone else. Vocal coach Carlo Edwards (David Haig) and venerated conductor Arturo Toscanini (John Kavanagh) prepare Florence for a big concert at the world-famous Carnegie Hall. However, St Clair worries that the stress of the forthcoming engagement is playing havoc with her faltering health. "What if it kills you?" he frets. "Then I shall die happy," smiles Florence serenely. Audiences will certainly die happy after watching Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep is mesmerising, bringing tenderness and vulnerability to a role that could so easily have been played as a pitiful figure of mockery. Grant is a wonderful comic foil and he demonstrates a light touch in moving scenes that remind us of his oft-ignored abilities as a dramatic actor. Period design is impeccable and Frears builds to a rousing emotional crescendo worthy of one of Jenkins' standing ovations. Bravo!

Robinson Crusoe 3 stars

Robinson Crusoe is shipwrecked on a tropical island, which is home to a parrot called Tuesday and his friends: a chameleon called Carmello, a feisty kingfisher called Kiki, an echidna called Epi, a pangolin called Pango, a tapir called Rosie and a doddering old goat called Scrubby. The animals are initially wary of the human interloper but eventually live in harmony with Robinson. Unfortunately, scheming cats May and Mal also survive the shipwreck and plot to seize control of the sun-kissed idyll.

  • GenreAdaptation, Adventure, Animation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastGeorge Babbit, Ron Allen, Laila Berzins, Yuri Lowenthal, Colin Metzger, Lindsay Torrance.
  • DirectorBen Stassen, Vincent Kesteloot.
  • CountryBel/Fr
  • Duration90 mins
  • Official sitewww.robinson-crusoe.co.uk
  • Release06/05/2016

Published in 1719, Daniel Defoe's chronicle of a shipwreck survivor who lives alone on an island for 28 years, is a beautifully crafted study of solitude, resourcefulness and British imperialism. The gnawed bones of the book are still visible in Vincent Kesteloot and Ben Stassen's computer-animated retelling, but this Robinson Crusoe is a resolutely child-friendly edition, told from the perspective of birds and animals which befriend the title character during his tropical isolation. Cuteness and gentle humour trump sophisticated storytelling and harsh realism throughout. The feathered and furred critters speak to each other and trade one-liners - although Robinson can't understand their grunts, growls, purrs and squawks. The wildlife is extremely tame. Robinson (voiced by Yuri Lowenthal) heads to sea with his shaggy dog Aynsley (Doug Stone) and quickly falls foul of the ship's gnarly cats, May (Debi Tinsley) and Mal (Doucette again). A violent storm shipwrecks Robinson on an island, which is home to a macaw called Mak (David Howard) and his friends: a chameleon called Carmello (Colin Metzger), a feisty kingfisher called Kiki (Lindsay Torrance), an echidna called Epi (Sandy Fox), a pangolin called Pango (Jeff Doucette), a tapir called Rosie (Laila Berzins) and a doddering old goat called Scrubby (Joey Camen). Mak has always been a dreamer and believes the glittering treasures, which sometimes wash up on the sun-kissed idyll, indicate a brighter future over the horizon. The other denizens of the island reject the bird's fantasies. "My dear macaw, you must wake up and smell the papaya," wearily intones Carmello. Robinson's unexpected arrival adds fuel to Mak's suspicions that the world doesn't begin and end on the island. The animals are initially wary of the human interloper, but eventually live in harmony with the gangly shipwreck survivor in a makeshift tree house. Unfortunately, Machiavellian moggies May and Mal also avoid a watery grave and they plot revenge from nearby Curse Island, flanked by their army of hungry kittens. Robinson Crusoe is a simplistic and sporadically entertaining journey of self-discovery. The colourful animation pops, but vocal performances are flat and some of the gags misfire, although early scenes are a rich source of humour as the island's denizens study a human for the first time. "He's stripped off his skin!" shrieks Kiki as Robinson removes a jacket. Co-directors Kesteloot and Stassen choreograph energetic action sequences to take advantage of the 3D format. This eye-popping extra dimension is used smartly in one breathless chase along a network of irrigation pipes that carries precious water to the tree house and other parts of the island. The camera careens along the precariously constructed flumes, occasionally swooping along vertiginous rock faces that support the pipes. It's a long way down.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 7th May 2016
Sunday 8th May 2016
Monday 9th May 2016
Tuesday 10th May 2016
Wednesday 11th May 2016
Thursday 12th May 2016

This film is also showing at:

The Jungle Book 3 stars

A young boy called Mowgli is raised by wolves Akela and Raksha. The boy's presence in the jungle is an affront to Shere Khan, the Bengal tiger, who resolves to kill Mowgli. Thus the man cub must leave his wolf parents and embark on a perilous journey of self-discovery in the company of Bagheera the black panther and Baloo the bear. En route, Mowgli has a crushing encounter with Kaa the python and is sweet-talked by the deceptively dangerous King Louie.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Drama, Family, Family
  • CastIdris Elba, Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, Christopher Walken, Lupita Nyong'o, Giancarlo Esposito, Sir Ben Kingsley, Neel Sethi.
  • DirectorJon Favreau.
  • WriterJustin Marks.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration106 mins
  • Official sitewww.disney.co.uk
  • Release15/04/2016

The bare necessities of a contented life will come to you by going on safari with Jon Favreau's technically dazzling romp through the stories of Rudyard Kipling. Not since James Cameron's Avatar has a 3D digital world been conjured with such depth and precision. Shot in downtown Los Angeles and beautifully rendered as untamed wilderness on computer hard drives, this immersive Jungle Book retains the wide-eyed charm of the 1967 Disney animation including three songs and comic relief from a rascally bear named Baloo, voiced to droll perfection by Bill Murray. "You have never been a more endangered species than you are now," the hirsute honey thief informs an Indian porcupine (Garry Shandling) during one amusing altercation. Vibrant colour radiates off the screen and gooey sentimentality oozes like sap during the rousing final act, but scriptwriter Justin Marks isn't afraid to hack into darker territory. Shere Khan the Bengal tiger evokes a heartbreaking scene from The Lion King in his relentless, blood-crazed pursuit of Mowgli, and the animated version's jazziest interlude - I Wan'na Be Like You with jungle VIP King Louie and his swingin' band of monkeysicians - is repurposed as a terrifying chase. Man cub Mowgli (Neel Sethi) is raised by wolves Akela (Giancarlo Esposito) and Raksha (Lupita Nyong'o) as a brother to other pups. A terrible drought necessitates an uneasy truce between predators and prey around the watering hole, and other denizens of the jungle finally get to see Mowgli close-up. The boy is an affront to Shere Khan (Idris Elba), who lost an eye to a fiery torch wielded by Mowgli's father. "A man cub becomes man, and man is forbidden!" snarls the big cat, who demands the child be handed over to him for slaughter. Akela and Raksha refuse but Mowgli acknowledges his presence jeopardises the lupine clan. So he embarks on a perilous journey back to civilisation in the company of his protector, Bagheera the black panther (Sir Ben Kingsley). En route, Mowgli gathers honey for greedy Baloo (Murray) and is pressurised into sharing the secret of "the red flower" - fire - with menacing Gigantopithecus, King Louie (Christopher Walken). The Jungle Book flexes its digital muscles in every impeccably crafted frame, festooning the screen with a menagerie of anthropomorphised critters that are just as realistic as the shipwrecked tiger in Life Of Pi. Sethi is a tad wooden in comparison but it must be difficult for a 12-year-old newcomer to find an emotional core when the rest of the cast and lush backgrounds only spring to life in post-production. Vocal performances are strong, replete with disorienting use of Scarlett Johansson's seductive whisper in surround sound during Mowgli's crushing encounter with python Kaa. Trust in me: Favreau's film is a majestic walk on the wild side.

The Man Who Knew Infinity 3 stars

Srinivasa Ramanujan is a 25-year-old shipping clerk in 1913 Madras, who should be spending as much time as possible with his wife Janaki. Instead, he fills countless notebooks with his mathematical musings. He sends some of these proofs to revered academic GH Hardy, who invites Ramanujan to Trinity College, Cambridge to exercise his beautiful mind. Against the wishes of his bride and his harridan mother, Ramanujan accepts the invitation and travels by sea to the hallowed seat of learning.

  • GenreAdaptation, Biography, Drama
  • CastDev Patel, Toby Jones, Jeremy Irons, Stephen Fry, Jeremy Northam.
  • DirectorMatt Brown.
  • WriterMatt Brown.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration109 mins
  • Official site
  • Release08/04/2016 (selected cinemas)

Mathematics is the only universal language which transcends race, religion, culture and class. Breathtaking in its simplicity and application, the study of number, quantity and space impacts every facet of our lives, from GPS systems and the functionality of computers, to our ability to predict the weather. Adapted from Robert Kanigel's 1991 biography, The Man Who Knew Infinity is a handsome dramatisation of the life of a self-taught Indian mathematician, who came to England just before the First World War to share his passion for numbers. It's a glowing tribute, written and directed by Matthew Brown, which extols its remarkable subject, Srinivasa Ramanujan, as a beautiful mind, who conjured solutions out of the ether. Sadly, Brown's film fails to make clear exactly what these secrets were and how the lead character was instrumental in ploughing new cerebral furrows. Only once, on the subject of partitions, does the script invest time in illuminating the daunting challenge in layman's terms, so we can share in Ramanujan's frustrations and triumph as he wrestles with "a rabbit hole mystery of the universe". Ramanujan (Dev Patel) is a 25-year-old shipping clerk in 1914 Madras, who dreams about formulae, which he scribbles in chalk on temple floors. With the blessing of his employer, Sir Francis Spring (Stephen Fry), Ramanujan sends some of his mathematical musings to revered academic GH Hardy (Jeremy Irons), who is a fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge alongside Bertrand Russell (Jeremy Northam). Hardy invites the bank clerk to England to nurture his gift. Against the wishes of his controlling mother (Arundhati Nag), Ramanujan bids tearful farewell to his new wife (Devika Bhise) and travels by sea to the hallowed seat of learning. In rarefied surroundings, Ramanujan encounters jealousy from students and masters, including Professor Howard (Anthony Calf) and Major McMahon (Kevin McNally). Thankfully, a few scholars, such as John Edensor Littlewood (Toby Jones), recognise Ramanujan's raw talent and encourage the Indian to indulge his fascination with prime numbers. "Don't be intimidated," beams Littlewood. "The greatest knowledge often comes from the humblest of origins." Working closely with Hardy, Ramanujan makes a series of breakthroughs and challenges the Englishman's long-held atheism. "I don't believe in anything I can't prove," concedes Hardy. "Then you can't believe in me," replies Ramanujan sadly. The Man Who Knew Infinity was shot on location at Trinity College and the film savours the rich history and architecture as a backdrop to Ramanujan's journey of self-discovery. Patel and Irons are a pleasing double act - youthful exuberance colliding with stuffy stiff-upper-lipped restraint - culminating in genuinely touching scenes between the two men. However, by the poignant end credits, we're no closer to fully understanding Ramanujan's invaluable contribution to a world of rigorous theorems and proofs. If an equation exists, which describes the perfect biographical drama, it eludes the filmmakers.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Saturday 7th May 2016
Sunday 8th May 2016
Monday 9th May 2016
Tuesday 10th May 2016
Wednesday 11th May 2016
Thursday 12th May 2016